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Why Protein is Important for Healing Wounds

Posts Tagged ‘protein’

Why Protein is Important for Healing Wounds

Posted on: July 11th, 2016 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

What’s protein got to do with it?

A day doesn’t go by that I’m not bombarded with information on the newest diet, the latest exercise trend, or the fastest way to get in shape. (more…)

The Skinny on Quinoa

Posted on: October 13th, 2014 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

 

By Rob Striks, Special Writer for Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine

The problem with writing about quinoa is there are just way too many good things to say about it, and then it gets boring to read very quickly. For example, it’s really interesting and notable that quinoa is what’s called “a complete protein,” meaning it contains all nine of the essential amino acids that cannot be made by the body and therefore must come from the foods we eat.  (more…)

Food Substitutions

Posted on: July 10th, 2014 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

No Substitute For Substitutions

by
Rob Striks, Special Writer
Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine

Spaghetti squash is a great substitute for normally high-carb spaghetti.

At Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, we talk a lot about making dietary food substitutions in order to take in more protein, lose weight or gain energy to aid in wound healing.

Sometimes, the substitutions we recommend are appropriate for a much larger audience than just wound care patients. Diabetic, cardiac and obese patients can make important strides in their health by making simple substitutions in their diet.

With that in mind, I made two important discoveries this week that have revolutionized my entire diet. I cooked with garbanzo flour and I learned how to make fried rice out of cauliflower. This is literally, and I use the term “literally” correctly here, the best thing since sliced bread.

Garbanzo Bean Flour is available in supermarkets and online.

Garbanzo Bean Flour is available in supermarkets and online.

That’s because I can now use garbanzo flour in recipes where I used to use wheat products and the end result is not only tastier, it’s infinitely healthier for me. Garbanzo beans are a rich source for protein, dietary fiber and healthy carbohydrates. They’re also very low in fat.

This discovery is a personal triumph for me as I used to pride myself on being able to make healthy substitutions in all my cooking. My substitutions, though, did not necessarily result in a trim body or more energy.

For instance, I learned how to substitute skim milk for whipping cream in Fettuccine Carbonara, which is like ordering a Boston Cooler made with Häagen-Dazs ice cream and telling the server to use Diet Vernors instead of regular Vernors. No big payoff there.

Then when Egg Beaters came along, I saw the clouds part and a heavenly ray of light shine down. Finally, the answer to high cholesterol had arrived! Unfortunately, they arrived along with mandatory nutritional labeling, and you had to be a chemistry major to figure out what they were actually made of. Plus, they didn’t taste all that wonderful.

Then, there is the never-discussed shame of ordering Egg Beaters in a restaurant. If you’re heavy, the server thinks you’re cheating somewhere else in your diet. And if you’re slender, you’re obviously high maintenance. There’s no winning with egg substitutes physically or mentally.

Socca is a gluten-free flatbread made from garbanzo bean flour.

Socca is a gluten-free flatbread made from garbanzo bean flour.

I did make the transition to substituting fresh egg whites for whole eggs in recipes and I learned to accept the texture changes in the finished products. Luckily, it’s 2014 and fresh whole eggs are enjoying some great publicity for being on the Good-For-You List again. I am cutting back on the yolks just a bit.

What brought me to garbanzo flour was the advice from my cardiologist that I give up all wheat, rice and potato products; and the advice from a good friend that I try socca, a food that’s like bread only it’s made with garbanzo flour instead of wheat flour. Cue the choir, it was fabulous.

Then, while putting together a ground turkey meat loaf, I substituted garbanzo flour for breadcrumbs and got another marvelous lift – a super protein, high-fiber meat loaf that held together perfectly. Is there anything these garbanzo’s can’t do?

Luscious chocolate cake made from garbanzo bean flour: Heaven!

Luscious chocolate cake made from garbanzo bean flour: Heaven!

A rich chocolate flourless cake made with garbanzo beans, you ask? The answer is yes and it’s right here. Make it and I guarantee the clouds will part for you

Pulse the cauliflower in a food processor or use a grater to make superb cauliflower fried rice.

Pulse the cauliflower in a food processor or use a grater to make superb cauliflower fried rice.

Now about that fried rice made with cauliflower. Who knew! I saw this demonstration online, I tried it and not only did I not need a nap after eating it, I actually felt quite energized. One of the secrets is using a food processor to pulse the uncooked cauliflower into tiny rice-size pieces. Then during the cooking process, you only use a small amount of liquid to steam the cauliflower so it doesn’t turn mushy.

Once you understand the liquid-holding and liquid-releasing properties in vegetables during cooking, there’s practically no limit to how you can use them as substitutes to enhance your nutrition. Spinach, for example, releases a lot of moisture when it’s cooked.

Spinach releases a lot of moisture during cooking.

Spinach releases a lot of moisture during cooking.

The same goes for mushrooms. So if you’re making quinoa with spinach and/or mushrooms and you want the same drier consistency, you have to use a bit less liquid than the usual two parts water to one part quinoa in the recipe.

In the beginning, using vegetables as substitutes in recipes works best when the seasonings usually overpower the dish. Like in the cauliflower fried rice, the soy sauce and seasonings over power any strong cauliflower taste.

Like spinach, mushrooms release liquid during cooking.

Like spinach, mushrooms release liquid during cooking.

Later, as you become more accustomed to the flavor and texture of the cauliflower, you may find yourself using less of the overpowering flavors in order to let the cauliflower taste come through.

So now that you can’t wait to garbanzo your diet, where do you get garbanzo flour? Well, you can make it yourself by grinding non-hydrated garbanzo beans in a spice grinder until they’re the consistency of flour, you can buy the flour already processed at most big supermarkets, or you can buy it online.

Try garbanzo flour for wheat flour. Check out cauliflower in place of rice. You can even prepare parsnips so they taste like sautéed potatoes. There’s no substitute for substitutions when it comes to eating healthier.

Hmmm…now that I think about it, lentils are beans and they’re also high in protein and low in fat. I wonder what would happen if I put them in my spice grinder and……

I’ll get back with you.

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Reading Food Nutrition Labels

Posted on: January 6th, 2014 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

Nutrition labels can be a bit confusing for many of us.
How can we decipher all of the confusing nutrition labels, numbers, serving sizes, carbohydrates, and more so that we can achieve and maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle?

Nutrition labels can be a bit confusing for many of us, Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine, West Bloomfield, Michigan.

Encompass Healthcare in Michigan knows that nutrition labels can be a bit confusing for many of us. We help decipher all of the confusing numbers.

See on Scoop.itWound Care

Learn how to read and understand food nutrition labels. (Know your food! Learning to read food #nutrition labels can help you make healthier choices.

(more…)

Wound Healing Nutrition

Posted on: May 7th, 2013 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

Wound Healing Nutrition

Shaved Bean and Asparagus Salad

 (Photo credit: Cara Lyons)

At Encompass HealthCare, wound healing nutrition is vital for proper wound healing.  Check out this great recipe!

Serves: 10
Hands-on time: 25 minutes
Total time: 25 minutes

INGREDIENTS:

  • 2 bunches fresh asparagus (about 1 lb each)
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1 medium red onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 1/2 cups cooked cannellini beans or 2 15-oz BPA-free cans cannellini beans, drained and rinsed well
  • 2 tbsp fresh orange juice
  • 2 tbsp fresh lemon juice
  • 1 tbsp champagne vinegar
  • 1/2 cup chopped unsalted walnuts (2 oz), lightly toasted
  • 1/2 cup shaved Pecorino Romano or Parmesan cheese (2 oz)
  • 1/4 cup slivered basil
  • Sea salt and fresh ground black pepper, to taste

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Hold each spear of asparagus by its thick stem and lay it down on a cutting board. Using a vegetable peeler, shave asparagus into long ribbons. Place ribbons in a large bowl and discard remaining stems. (NOTE: You should be left with about 1 lb shaved asparagus.) Drizzle oil over asparagus and toss to coat.
  2. Add onion, beans, orange and lemon juices, and vinegar. Toss to combine.
  3. Fold in walnuts, cheese and basil. Season with salt and pepper. This salad can be served immediately or prepared in advance; chill, covered, for 4 to 6 hours in refrigerator.

Nutrients per 3/4-cup serving: Calories: 171, Total Fat: 8 g, Sat. Fat: 2 g, Monounsaturated Fat: 2 g,Polyunsaturated Fat: 3 g, Carbs: 17 g, Fiber: 6 g, Protein: 9 g, Sugars: 3 g, Sodium: 137 mg, Cholesterol: 6 mg

TIP:
Toast your walnuts in a dry skillet on medium-low heat until lightly browned and fragrant. And, to easily shave cheese, use a vegetable peeler.

Increase Your Protein and Wound Healing With Fish?

Posted on: April 8th, 2013 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

INCREASE YOUR PROTEIN AND WOUND HEALING BY EATING FISH?

Is it possible to increase your protein and thus, improve wound healing?

Yes! Wound healing can be enhanced with good nutrition, especially higher levels of protein when faced with very serious wounds.

Halibut and many other “white” fish contain healthy doses of protein at near zero fat levels. Find your Omega 3’s, 6’s, and 9’s and ensure good wound healing by making sure you get enough protein. Try out this recipe below.

 

INGREDIENTS:

6 oz. halibut (or other fish such as whitefish, cod, flounder)

2 T. cilantro

1T. olive oil

1 T. lime juice

salt, pepper

 

Preheat oven to 425 F.  Brush fish with olive oil and and squeeze lime juice over fish.  Sprinkle with cilantro and bake approximately 12 minutes or until done.

Winning the Wound Care War

Posted on: February 10th, 2012 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

WOUND CARE WAR

Winning the wound care war care leads us into the wonderful world of healing. Here, you’ll learn how utterly amazing your body functions to repair itself, how it’s always ready to initiate the healing process and how we can intervene when that process goes awry. (more…)

 

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