Facebook
Twitter
YouTube
LinkedIn
Instagram


Call Today: 248.624.9800
Or Call: 855-WOUND-DOC
Fax: 248.624.9825
  M-F 8am to 5pm | Sat & Sun 8am to 12pm
Call Today: 248.624.9800
M-F 8am to 5pm | Sat & Sun 8am to 12pm

A Hospital-Type Environment with Hospital-Level Equipment, Without the Risks Of Being In the Hospital

Posts Tagged ‘doctor’

A Hospital-Type Environment with Hospital-Level Equipment, Without the Risks Of Being In the Hospital

Posted on: October 11th, 2021 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine in West Bloomfield, Michigan is Metro Detroit’s only full-service wound healing & infection facility, offering patients everything possible for healing under one roof. Dr. Bruce Ruben launched Encompass HealthCare to offer patients a hospital-type environment with hospital-level equipment, without the risks of being in the hospital.

Wound Care News explains why it’s safer and overall better to visit a wound-care specialist like Dr. Bruce Ruben at Encompass HealthCare than going to a hospital. This is especially true during the current Covid-19 pandemic.

If you’re one of the 6.7 million Americans living with a chronic wound, you may well be referred to a wound care specialist for treatment. In this article, we’ll explore when you should see a wound care specialist, why proper wound care is so vitally important, and how specialist treatment can reduce the risk of complications and encourage a speedy recovery.

While most primary care physicians are qualified to treat a straightforward wound, resulting from a day-to-day injury, they may not be the right person to deal with a complex or non-healing wound. In addition to the usual medical training, wound care specialists undergo a rigorous three-year wound care program and written exam. They are, therefore, uniquely qualified in the most sophisticated treatments, techniques, and technologies to help patients recover more quickly from serious wounds.

To maintain their status, wound care specialists also have to secure continuing education credits and periodically requalify for certification. As a result, a qualified wound care professional will be up to date with the latest developments and research into wound care.

During your first visit, your wound care specialist will conduct a thorough diagnostic analysis of your wound, including the cause of the wound and any issues that might be obstructing your healing. You will then be given a customized treatment plan that takes into account your case history and the type of wound, your ability to comply with particular treatments (for instance, physical therapy), and any additional treatments you might require. You will then be scheduled for a series of visits with your wound care specialists, during which your healing will be evaluated, and your treatment modified.

Not every wound needs specialist treatment. In most cases, a simple wound that results from an injury can be treated by a primary healthcare provider. More serious wounds may require treatment in the hospital, followed by recovery at home. And, of course, if you see any signs that the wound is infected, such as redness, increased pain, a bad smell, fever, or swelling, you should call your doctor immediately.

However, certain kinds of wounds are more likely to need specialist treatment. For instance, complex wounds such as vascular ulcers, diabetic ulcers, radiation wounds, various types of traumatic injury, and some post-operative wounds may benefit from treatment in a wound care center.

There are also health conditions that may make it harder for your wound to heal. These include:

  • Diabetes

  • Congestive heart failure

  • Vascular disease

  • Incontinence

  • Severe obesity

  • Renal failure

  • Nerve damage

Certain lifestyle issues may also prevent wound healing. For instance, a poor diet, excessive alcohol intake, smoking, and being inactive may also impede your recovery from a wound.

In general, if your wound has not started to heal after 2 weeks, or has not healed completely within 6 weeks, then you should consider visiting a wound care specialist.

For many patients, treatment by a wound care specialist can have a dramatic positive impact on their recovery and quality of life. The key benefits of specialized wound care treatment include:

Unlike a regular clinician, a wound care specialist has the knowledge to develop an individualized treatment based on your specific wound, health issues, clinical history, and personal preferences. They will then develop a care plan using this information, to help speed your recovery and healing.

Because the plan has been designed specifically for you, you are more likely to be able and willing to follow it. For instance, a specialist wound care professional could recommend the kinds of dressings that you will be most comfortable with, or take your current mobility into consideration when making recommendations about physical therapy. By contrast, a non-specialist might recommend a more standardized approach that could be harder for you to comply with.

The incorrect treatment of a wound can be potentially catastrophic. For instance, diabetic foot ulcers are the most common cause of diabetes-related amputations—infected or non-healing ulcers can result in the patient losing a foot or the whole lower part of the leg.

Long-term non-healing wounds are particularly prone to infection. Infections such as MRSA can enter the bloodstream via the wound, resulting in serious illnesses. In the most severe cases, infections can lead to sepsis, a potentially fatal medical condition triggered by the body’s immune response.

Working with a wound specialist is the best way to make sure that your wound receives the most effective treatment. A customized wound care program will be designed to approach your wound healing from multiple angles, such as increasing your circulation, reducing pain, and creating the best environment to promote recovery.

Wound care centers have access to the latest wound care treatments and technologies that may not be available in a primary healthcare facility. Advanced treatments that may be helpful in treating non-healing or complex wounds include:

  • Wound Vac Therapy

Vacuum-assisted wound closure, also known as Wound Vac treatment, involves using a vacuum pump to create negative pressure to seal a foam bandage over an open wound. The pressure pulls the edges of the wound together, promoting healing by reducing swelling, stimulating tissue growth, and preventing infections.

  • Ultrasound

Ultrasound treatment uses sound waves to encourage healing, reduce inflammation and pain, and increase circulation and soft tissue mobility.

  • Growth Factor Therapy

Growth factors are chemicals naturally secreted in the body that encourage cell growth. Growth factor therapy involves applying growth factors directly to the wound to promote the growth of wound-healing cells.

In general, wound care specialists take a more proactive, aggressive approach to wound treatment, based on the latest medical findings. For non-healing wounds, frequent debridement (removal of dead tissue) and more active medical interventions may reduce the time to heal and improve the patient’s comfort level.

Perhaps one of the most important roles of the wound specialist is to educate both the patient and their family about how to care for the wound and manage the process of healing. For those with chronic or severe wounds, recovery can be a slow and grueling process. A wound care specialist can offer advice about managing the emotional aspects of recovery, making the best lifestyle choices to promote healing, understanding your wound and how to care for it as it heals, and transitioning safely and easily to self-care.

Above all, our staff treats everyone like family. That’s the Encompass difference!

Dr. Bruce Ruben Praises Caregivers – Our Teammates

Posted on: August 22nd, 2018 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

At Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, we are keenly aware that our “customers” are not only our patients. We know that along with each patient there is at least one caregiver who is devoted to the physical and mental health of the patient. In some cases, there is an entire team of caregivers. These can be the adult children of the patient, hired nurses, friends or other relatives. And our staff at Encompass knows that this is not an easy job.

Being a caregiver can often feel like a lonely, thankless job. Having a caregiver charged with advocating for the patient is an important asset in the health field. In fact, our doctors and other medical professionals at Encompass see each caregiver as part of our own team. We all have the health of our patients as our top priority and we are dependent on a good relationship with each caregiver.

Encompass HealthCare & Dr. Ruben Salute the Caregivers

Research shows that caregivers manage better if they feel confident about handling the daily hassles of caregiving. The relationship between caregiver, patient, healthcare professionals and family members is such an important relationship and one that must be respected at all times.

Our hearts go out to the many dedicated souls who are serving as caregivers for our patients. We pledge to continue working with you to help ensure the good health of our patients. Additionally, we commend you for all you do. We know that even if you don’t always feel the gratitude, the patient and the patient’s family members are grateful for you. At Encompass HealthCare, we know that we couldn’t do it without you. Thank you!

Why Self-Care is So Important

Posted on: May 22nd, 2018 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments
At Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, we know how important both self-care and the role of caretaker is to our patients. On a daily basis, we salute those men and women who take care of our patients by driving them to doctor’s visits at Encompass, ensuring they are eating properly, doling out their medication and advocating for them. Whether the caregiver is a hired professional, a family member or a friend, we recognize the sacrifice these individuals are making on behalf of another soul.

What Defines Self-Care?

This month, however, we want to focus our blog post on another issue that is of utmost concern for our patients at Encompass. The role of self-care in your daily health regimen. After all, no one cares about you more than yourself. You might rely on a caregiver for some daily functions and tasks, but there are many ways that you can provide self-care management to ensure a healthy lifestyle for yourself that is free from disease, infections and wounds.
Some tips for self-care include living a healthy life by trying to only eat healthy foods, get enough sleep, exercise regularly and take only the doctor’s prescribed doses of your medicines. Regardless of your age, it’s important to manage stress and go for regular medical check-ups.
Additionally, one of the most important aspects of self-care that Dr. Bruce Ruben at Encompass HealthCare encourages is to practice good hygiene. Good hygiene is important for social, medical, and psychological reasons in that it not only reduces the risk of illness, but it also improves the way others view you and how you view yourself. Dealing with infectious disease, Dr. Ruben cannot stress enough the importance of good hygiene on a regular basis as a key principle in self-care for his patients.

Social Interaction is Self-Care

Believe it or not, another aspect of self-care is social interaction. Studies have shown that individuals who live sociable lives live longer. See friends and family members to build your sense of belonging. You can also join a variety of different support groups to make new friends. Encompass HealthCare can recommend some local support groups and social clubs to help keep you active and involved.Self-care is important value at Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine, West Bloomfield, Michigan
Finally, hobbies are an integral part of healthy self-care. Try to do something you enjoy every day, whether it be exercising, dancing, going to a movie, taking a walk, watching a favorite TV show, working in the garden, painting or reading. You should also find ways to relax, like meditation, yoga, getting a massage, taking a bath or walking on a local path.
It is our strong desire at Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine that our patients live long and healthy lives. We know you can’t do that on your own. It takes a village of caretakers, support team and physicians. However, self-care management is also a very critical component of your healthy life.

Congratulations to Dr. Bruce Ruben Who Received The 2018 Top Infectious Disease, Hyperbaric Medicine & Wound Care Specialist Award in Michigan!

Posted on: April 28th, 2018 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

We are so proud of our Doctor Bruce Ruben who received the 2018 Top Infectious Disease, Hyperbaric Medicine & Wound Care Specialist award in Michigan! Dr. Bruce Ruben, internationally known as “The Wound Doc,” is the Founder and Medical Director of Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine. Board certified in Internal Medicine, Infectious Disease, and Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine, Dr. Ruben pioneered outpatient IV therapy and outpatient wound care.  To read about Dr. Ruben and his award, click HERE.

Bruce E. Ruben, M.D., founder and Medical Director of Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine, West Bloomfield, Michigan receives 2018 Top Doctor Award

Bruce E. Ruben, M.D., founder and Medical Director of Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine, West Bloomfield, Michigan receives 2018 Top Doctor Award.

Bruce E. Ruben, M.D., founder and Medical Director of Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine, West Bloomfield, Michigan receives 2018 Top Doctor AwardRuben is also a member of the Medical and Scientific Advisory Committee and National Spinal Cord Injury Association (NSCIA) board, an advisory board member of WoundSource, and serves on the board of The Emily Stillman Foundation in the Detroit and West Bloomfield, Michigan area.

EXPERT INFECTION & WOUND HEALING DOCTOR

Dr. Bruce Ruben is an expert in healing stubborn, non-healing infections & wounds. Offering services such as  I.V. antibiotic therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, venous ablation, manual lymphatic drainage, unna boots, skin substitutes & more, Doctor Ruben and his staff offer these services to heal stubborn bed sores, pressure ulcers, bacterial infections, viral infections, burns, & other medical problems. His medical contributions are unparalleled & remarkably, patients can refer themselves.

The office phone number is 248-624-9800 or Dr. Ruben can be reached through our contact form found HERE.

 

 

 

Leading Infectious Disease, Hyperbaric Medicine and Wound Care Specialist, Bruce E. Ruben, MD is to be Recognized as a 2018 Top Doctor in Michigan

 

 

“Really listening can tell you all you need to know about what’s wrong with that patient, and it’s never failed me yet,” says Dr. Bruce Ruben. Read Why Technology Will Never Replace Great Doctors.

Posted on: March 18th, 2016 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

“Really listening can tell you all you need to know about what’s wrong with that patient, and it’s never failed me yet,” says Dr. Bruce Ruben.

Read Why Technology Will Never Replace Great Doctors.fraid that new technology might replace great doctors? Not a chance! Read what Bruce Ruben, M.D. has to say about this in LifeZette’s article below.

(more…)

Stasis Ulcer Information from Dr. Bruce Ruben

Posted on: October 7th, 2015 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

Overview of Venous Stasis Ulcers

A stasis ulcer is a breakdown of the skin (ulcer) caused by fluid build-up in the skin from poor vein function (venous insufficiency). Fluid leaks from the veins into skin tissue when the blood backs up rather than returning to the heart through the veins.

This wound is a result of venous insufficiency (venous stasis ulcer)--Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, Michigan.

This wound is a result of venous insufficiency (venous stasis ulcer)–Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, Michigan.

Who’s At Risk
Leg vein malfunction (venous insufficiency) affects 2–5% of Americans, and approximately half a million Americans have stasis ulcers. Women are more often affected by stasis ulcers than men.

Your risk for acquiring a stasis ulcer is greater if you:

  • Are overweight.
  • Have varicose veins.
  • Have had blood clots in your legs.
  • Had a leg injury (trauma) that might affect blood flow in your leg veins; even minor trauma may cause an ulcer.

Signs and Symptoms

Swelling of the leg, brown discoloration, or an itchy, red, rough area (stasis dermatitis) may appear before you notice an ulcer. This is often seen on the inner ankle area first, although any area on the lower leg may be affected. Varicose veins may be present. Sometimes there are hard, tender lumps under the skin near the ulcer.

The ulcer is a crater-like, irregular area of skin loss. It may be an open, easily bleeding, painful wound, or it might have a thick black scab. The level of pain varies.
Self-Care Guidelines
People with a leg ulcer should seek medical care if it is anything beyond a small scrape or cut on the surface of the skin.

If the ulcer appears minor:
Clean it with soap and water.
Apply a thin layer of petroleum jelly (Vaseline®) and a clean gauze bandage.
Avoid putting any tape or adhesive on the skin.
Avoid using topical antibiotics and other over-the-counter products, as people with leg ulcers often become allergic to these products.

When to Seek Medical Care

If you have pain, swelling, spreading red areas, fever, or any open wound that does not heal after a few days of self-care, seek medical advice.

Treatments Your Physician May Prescribe
In addition to a thorough exam, your physician may test to evaluate how well your veins are working.

Treatment may consist of:

  • Procedures to reduce leg swelling.
  • Medication for any dermatitis or infection that is present.
  • Special wound dressings.
  • Pentoxifylline to aid healing.
  • Surgery if other medical treatment fails.
  • Compression hose to prevent the ulcer from coming back.
  • Most ulcers heal within 1–4 months, but about 25% will still be present after a year.

Trusted Links
MedlinePlus: Leg Injuries and Disorders
MedlinePlus: Vascular Diseases

References

Bolognia, Jean L., ed. Dermatology, pp.1635. New York: Mosby, 2003.

Freedberg, Irwin M., ed. Fitzpatrick’s Dermatology in General Medicine. 6th ed. pp.21. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2003.

 

Source: SkinSight.com

If you like this blog, please share it! 

Patient Compliance

Posted on: June 6th, 2014 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

Doctor-PatientPATIENT COMPLIANCE AND THE DOCTOR-PATIENT RELATIONSHIP

by Rob Striks, Special Writer
Encompass HealthCare & Wound Medicine 

“That’s a team, gentlemen, and either, we heal, now, as a team, or we will die as individuals. That’s football, guys, that’s all it is. Now, what are you gonna do?” – From the movie, “Any Given Sunday”

Before we get into motivation, which is at the heart of compliance, let me say from the start that I am a saboteur of my own health. I’m my own worst enemy when it comes to following through on my physicians’ long-term health strategies. Obviously, if I did everything my physicians told me to do over the years, I’d probably be a slender, 185 pounds of muscle, have many less stents and be able to run marathons.

If I followed their advice, I’d be the picture of health, able to qualify for millions of dollars of life insurance and basking in the wonderful example I would have been setting for my children.

Mental Barriers quoteBut I didn’t always follow my doctors’ advice, or, if I did, I sabotaged before I could make the lifestyle changes permanent. There’s a phrase for patients like me: Non-Compliant. We don’t comply with the physician’s advice. We’re not necessarily bad people or bad patients. Quite the contrary, we’re generally very good, salt-of-the-earth types who, unfortunately, have mental barriers to doing what’s right for our bodies.

Sometimes, we’re head cases. Like somewhere down deep we don’t want to get healthier or we think we’re too far-gone to get healthier. So we sabotage or we simply don’t comply. Then, when we fail to get healthier, we get to be right and say, “See? I really am too far-gone.” It’s negative reinforcement. It’s also illogical like taking drugs is illogical. It may feel somewhat good while you’re doing it or feeling it, but you’re actually killing yourself.

Rest assured our doctors know all about this stuff as they deal with it every day. They also know all about non-compliance because they’re guilty of the same mentalities. They don’t get a pass just because they’ve gone to medical school. So they know our psyche. Good bedside manner or not, they know about human frailty.

Bullied Patient QuoteBut doctors practice inside very indefinable emotional boundaries. Come down too hard on patients and they may get alienated, they might not come back to finish their treatments. I don’t think any patient can be bullied into complying with their doctor’s advice. Compassion will always trump enforcement when it comes to patient compliance.

On the other hand, going too easy on a patient doesn’t get the job done either. There’s certainly a middle ground where the doctor leads the patient, through education and commitment, to the point where the patient arrives at his or her own conclusion of, “I need to make these lifestyle changes or things are going to continue going downhill for me.”

That’s an entirely different mindset than the old adage, “You can lead a horse to water but you can’t make it drink.” To keep the “care” in healthcare, the methodology should be, “I’m going to lead you to the water while teaching you how you’ll benefit by drinking it. Then, when we get to the water, it’ll be your choice alone whether you drink or not.

Authentic ComplianceThat’s the point where authentic compliance begins. The physician has laid out exactly what is needed to comply in a way the individual patient “gets.” Now it’s up to the patient to take the shot, score the touchdown or whatever sports-related metaphor you can think of that means win.

I love the scene in The Untouchables where Sean Connery tells Kevin Costner what he has to do in order to get Al Capone because it illustrates the motivation a patient needs to comply with his or her doctor’s suggestions.

Malone: You said you wanted to get Capone. Do you really wanna get him? You see what I’m saying is, what are you prepared to do?

Ness: Anything within the law.

Malone: And *then* what are you prepared to do? If you open the can on these worms you must be prepared to go all the way. Because they’re not gonna give up the fight, until one of you is dead.

Can you imagine what it’d be like to hear that from your primary care physician?

Doctor: You said you wanted to get healthy. Do you really wanna get healthy? Then what are you prepared to do? Simply take the medications and hope everything falls into place? If you want to beat heart disease, diabetes or obesity, if you want to fully heal a wound or improve circulation to your legs, then you must be prepared to go all the way. Because those conditions aren’t gonna give up the fight until one of you is dead.

For a certain patient, those words from a good physician could be extremely powerful and motivating, particularly if they were delivered with a deep Scottish accent.

Wishful Thinking QuoteOr, they could fall flat since all patients react differently. And that may be the point of this whole piece. Compliance happens as a result of the patient-doctor relationship. If you’re a physician and you don’t have the relationship, compliance is just wishful thinking.

I’m sure I’m not the first to propose that medical schools teach mandatory classes in how to get patients to comply. Imagine classes titled, “Bedside Manner 101,” “Patient Psychology and Compliance 760,” or “Doctor-Patient Relationship 370.”

I close this out with two emotional appeals from two different films that I try to remember when whatever I’m doing isn’t working. Both scenes are about compliance and motivation. The first is from Rocky III:

Adrian: …you gotta want to do it for the right reasons. Not for the guilt over Mickey, not for the people, not for the title, not for money or me, but for you. Just you. Just you alone.

Rocky Balboa: And if I lose?

Adrian: Then you lose. But at least you lose with no excuses, no fear. And I know you can live with that.

Rocky Balboa: How did you get so tough?

Adrian: I live with a fighter.

And from The Outlaw Josey Wales:

Josey Wales: Now remember, when things look bad and it looks like you’re not gonna make it, then you gotta get mean. I mean plumb, mad-dog mean. ‘Cause if you lose your head and you give up, then you neither live nor win. That’s just the way it is.

So are you ready, doctors and patients?

Comply.

HOW TO BE A PATIENT

Posted on: May 15th, 2014 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

 

By Rob Striks, Special Writer
Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine

I’m a senior patient, but not in terms of age. I have senior-level experience as a patient. Aside from my lousy diet, lack of exercise and imperfect glucose control, I’ve got senior patient down pat. (more…)

 

Featured Video

 

Loading Quotes...

 

 

© 2021 Encompass HealthCare | Designed by Access Technology

2300 Haggerty Road, Suite 1190 | West Bloomfield, Michigan 48323 | 248-624-9800