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Healthy Eating is the Key!

Archive for the ‘Blog’ Category

Healthy Eating is the Key!

Posted on: July 1st, 2020 by Jada Woody No Comments

One of the most important factors in a good healing regimen (after quality of care and patient compliance) is nutrition! We see lots of patients each day who are trying to heal a wound or burn, get rid of a nasty infection, or simply trying to get healthier overall, and one of the unfortunate things many of them have in common is poor nutrition. 

Most people don’t think about nutrition when they have an injury or wound. Patients often think first about what they can do for their symptoms, their pain or discomfort, and what can be done about the injury itself. Should they wrap it? Cleanse it? Keep it try or moisturized? To they need medications or an x-ray? These are all valid thoughts and questions of course, but if a patient follows all of these steps and guidelines, and doesn’t have the right diet or daily nutrition, they may still have trouble healing!

So here’s what we’ve found at Encompass HealthCare! A patient who is attempting to heal from a wound, injury, or infection, must have a well-balanced diet yes, but they may also need an increase in protein during the healing process! Now, let’s address both sides of this statement.

First, a well-balanced diet!

What does this really mean? Well, a dictionary definition would be that a well-balanced diet is one which gives the body the nutrients it needs to function correctly. Great! But we also have to recognize that the nutrients needed are actually different for each and every person. A seven year old girl does not need the same amount of proteins or fats or calories each day as a 28 year old NFL player does, right? So how do we know how much to eat of what?

Luckily, there are lots of great resources on the internet that can tell you exactly how much and what kinds of food you should be eating based on a number of factors like your sex, weight, height, age, activity level, allergies, etc. Some of these diet calculators can be extremely helpful. But to put it simply, most individuals can follow these very basic guidelines for healthy choices;

Nutrient Rich Food Groups:

  • Fresh Fruits
  • Fresh Vegetables
  • Lean Proteins
  • Whole Grains
  • Legumes & Nuts

These food groups offer a great variety of nutrients, including proteins and healthy fats and sugars. Do what you can to substitute these food groups in for less healthy alternatives like bacon, fried chicken, pops and sugary drinks, white bread, candied fruits, ice cream, cake, energy drinks, sausages, etc. The more you can eat from the nutrient rich list instead of the unhealthy food items, the better off you will be!

Another important note in a well-balanced diet is the quantity of food you’re eating. Don’t overeat. Try going one week only eating when you actually feel hungry. Studies show that those who only eat when hungry actually enjoy food more, spend less at grocery stores and restaurants, feel healthier, and tend to lose excess body weight they may have had before. These are all great reasons to try it out!


Nutrition While Healing

Now, the other side of nutrition that we talk to our patients about is “Nutrition While Healing”! This changes things a bit! While we still encourage our patients to keep a well-balanced diet, we also recommend that patients increase the intake of proteins when coming back from an injury or infection or when healing a wound. This increase in protein helps the body gear up for the healing process and typically increases the speed at which patients heal.

Proteins have a very important job in the body and in the healing process! There’s a good reason athletes use proteins for post-workout drinks and shakes! Proteins are responsible for the structure, function, and regulation of our tissues and organs. Including muscles, bones, skin, and much more.

Your body needs protein to help repair any damage done to the body. And if there is a significant amount of damage, say a third degree burn over the forearm, the body will need more protein than normal to complete the task of repairing the tissues! Hence, our guideline for increased protein intake during the healing process!

Keeping in mind that each person and their body’s needs are different, we recommend consulting a doctor or nutritional expert before changing any part of your diet. This is to ensure that the changes are proportionate to your body’s needs without risking any further injury or illness! These are guidelines we use when helping our patients heal! If you or a patient you know are dealing with a wound, burn, or infection that hasn’t made great healing progress in over a month, give us a call. Our physicians and wound care experts will assess the issue and determine what the non-healing factor(s) may be.

We hope this message was helpful to you! Be sure to pass it along, we all can use a healthful tip once in a while! Remember, a balanced diet will not only help you heal, but also can keep you from getting injured or becoming sick! Stay healthy friends!

Phone: (248)624-9800

Address: 2300 Haggerty Rd. Suite 1190 West Bloomfield, MI 48323

Website: www.encompasshealthcare.com

Meet Encompass HealthCare’s Wound Dogs

Posted on: June 23rd, 2020 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

At Encompass HealthCare, we believe that a calming, welcoming, and happy environment plays a big role in the healing of our patients! That is why Dr. Ruben, our medical director, has introduced two therapy dogs into our office! Inky and Pocket bring a sense of joy to our office each and every day! Many of our patients have attested to the calming affect the dogs have had on them and tell us they look forward to visiting the dogs at each appointment in our office.

 

Inky and Pocket have been nicknamed the Wound Dogs because of how quickly some of our patients have healed when they’ve spent extended time with the dogs. Many patients tell us how the Wound Dogs have lifted their spirits and given them the positive mindset they needed in order to heal! Pet therapy is so powerful!

 

We believe in the affect a healthy, happy pet can have on a person’s mental health and their healing experience in general! It follows along closely with Dr. Ruben’s philosophy of treating the WHOLE PATIENT, not just the hole in the patient!

 

Judging by how much they wag their tails…we think our dogs love being therapy pets! They get to go on a long scenic walk each day and get lots of love and attention from our staff and patients! Not to mention, TREATS! If you happen to be in our office, make sure you say hi to Inky and Pocket, they’ll be happy to see you!

Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy – Healing for Burns!

Posted on: June 4th, 2020 by Encompass Healthcare

In order to understand the use of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT) to heal burns, it is first important to understand the four burn classifications.

Classification of Burns
A first-degree or superficial burn affects only the epidermis or outer layer of skin. The burn site is red, painful, and dry with no blistering. A mild sunburn is one example of a first-degree burn. Long-term tissue damage is rare and usually consists of a lightening or a darkening in
the skin color.

In a second-degree or partial-thickness burn, the epidermis and part of the dermis layer of skin are damaged. The burn site appears red, blistered, and may be swollen and painful.

With a third-degree or full-thickness burn, the epidermis and dermis are destroyed. Burns where there is also damage to the underlying tendon, muscle, and bone are considered to be fourth-degree burns. The burn site appears white or charred and no sensation is felt in the area because the nerve endings have been destroyed and worse, the blood vessels carrying needed oxygen have also been destroyed.

hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-chamber-west bloomfield-michigan

Benefits of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy for Treating Burns
Therapeutic use of HBOT in burns is most often utilized for second and third degree burn cases. In third degree burns, the initial thermal injury occurs followed by circumferential, widening tissue loss. This means that the surrounding tissue of the burn also becomes damaged because the blood vessels have been destroyed as a consequence of the burn. When the blood vessels are destroyed, downstream blood flow from the burn site is arrested, propagating further tissue death due to a lack of oxygen.

When tissue death occurs, the body does not recognize that tissue as its own and perceives that it is a potentially harmful invader. This jeopardized tissue becomes a target for its own immune system and “attacks” the dying and surrounding tissues, resulting in more tissue death. This process is called ischemia reperfusion injury.

HBOT given within the first 48 to 72 hours following thermal injury increases the oxygen saturation to the body by up to 12 times that of breathing air at sea level. This can mitigate ischemia reperfusion injury and the possibility of advanced tissue destruction beyond the initial area of thermal injury by supplying the body with added oxygen that, in turn, can bring the damaged area “back to life.” This signals the body that the tissue is no longer a foreign invader and consequently, normal wound-healing processes are able to take place.

Beyond 72 hours, HBOT helps by continuing to promote new tissue growth, which encourages healing by aiding in the manufacturing of new blood vessels, which, in turn, make fibroblasts that are responsible for collagen production. In addition, HBOT reduces the body’s inflammation which otherwise would slow down the healing process. Finally, HBOT also offers infection control, as oxygen is the white blood cell’s weapon to kill bacteria.

In short, serious thermal burns patients are great candidates for hyperbaric oxygen therapy due to the mitigation of ischemia reperfusion injury, the promotion of new blood vessels and tissue growth, and the control of infection!

Patients who believe they may be candidates for HBOT should call our office. With a simple consultation from our physician, we can determine if HBOT is the right treatment for a patient. Appointments for our office can be made by phone or from our website. We’re here to help!

Encompass HealthCare – A Safe Place

Posted on: May 4th, 2020 by Jada Woody

If you or a loved one have tested positive for COVID-19 or believe you have been exposed, Dr. Bruce Ruben will gladly consult with you over the phone or by video conferencing! As a board-certified Infectious Disease Specialist, Dr. Ruben has prepared his entire career to deal. with infectious disease and pandemics like the one we find ourselves in now.

COVID-19 is not unfamiliar to Dr. Ruben. He has taken the time to study the virus and its affects. Dr. Ruben has done research not only on how to treat and cure the virus, but he’s also studied the successes that other countries have had against COVID-19 and has prepared to do the same!

Using this knowledge he gained from research, Dr. Ruben has decided to offer free telemedicine consults. This means if you need to be seen by Dr. Ruben, you don’t need to come into our office. We’ll conduct a virtual appointment for the health and safety of you, other patients, and of our staff.

For our patients who are still being seen for maladies other than COVID-19, our office has been sanitized to create a safe and worry-free environment for all. We are professionals when it comes to protecting from and preventing contagion, so you can feel rest assured that our office is a safe place to be treated, even in this time of uncertainty!

Remember, if you have tested positive for COVID-19 and are not hospital-bound, you should first call our office! Dr. Ruben, as an Infectious Disease Specialist, can provide specified treatments for you while helping you avoid the need for a hospital stay! According to the CDC, hospitals have a very high rate of Healthcare-Acquired Infections. Which means just by being admitted, you are increasing your risk of additional infections by 5-10% (depending on the hospital). Don’t take the risk! Call Dr. Ruben today!

If you have the following symptoms; fever, cough and shortness of breath, you should call your primary care physician or call Dr. Ruben directly. Your physician will direct you on whether or not you should be tested for COVID-19. If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19, you should seek emergency medical attention immediately. The emergency warning signs are as follows, according to the CDC:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

Again, Dr. Ruben is ready and willing to help. He and our staff are prepared to help. Please consult your doctor if you believe you should be tested and if you test positive for COVID-19 at any time, call Encompass Healthcare & Dr. Bruce Ruben!

Phone: (248)624-9800

For more information and recent updates on the COVID-19 virus, check the CDC’s website www.cdc.gov

What You Need to Know About Coronavirus

Posted on: February 5th, 2020 by Encompass Healthcare

Coronavirus continues to dominate the news as the epidemic spreads throughout China and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has confirmed cases in the United States. The first diagnosis of this novel (new) coronavirus named 2019-nCoV was in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China, and many nations have put restrictions in place for travel to and from China.

The confirmed cases in the United States currently are limited to Washington, California, Arizona and Illinois; however, the CDC is investigating potential cases in several other states, so more confirmations may be forthcoming.

On January 30, 2020, the CDC confirmed the first person-to-person transmission of the new coronavirus, between a husband and wife in Illinois. Subsequently, the World Health Organization (WHO) has declared the new coronavirus an international public health emergency, only the sixth time it’s done so. The CDC currently advises travelers to avoid all nonessential travel to China.

Here’s what you need to know about the 2019 novel coronavirus.

1. The 2019 novel coronavirus spreads from person to person, though not necessarily through actual contact. The CDC continues to research exactly how 2019-nCoV spreads, but does say it spreads from person to person. At this time, that doesn’t necessarily mean actual contact. With the previous outbreaks of similar conditions MERS and SARS, it was believed those viruses spread person to person when an infected person coughed or sneezed and virus particles were transmitted to others, much like how influenza and other respiratory viruses spread.

2. Symptoms range from mild to severe. The common cold is also spread by a coronavirus. For some patients, coronavirus symptoms mimic those of a common cold, while others experience the same symptoms that accompany a severe respiratory infection. These include runny nose, fever, cough, sore throat, and shortness of breath. In some cases, the symptoms are so severe they require hospitalization and have resulted in death. Right now, the CDC believes symptoms can appear within two days or wait as long as 14 days after exposure.

3. Treatment options are limited to addressing the symptoms.
As research into 2019-nCoV continues, there is no specific antiviral treatment available or recommended to fight the virus at this time. Instead, patients infected with the virus should receive appropriate treatment to help relieve symptoms, as well as restrict any activity outside the home and avoid crowded areas in order to prevent transmission.

4. There is no vaccine for 2019-nCoV infection. Because there currently is no vaccine to protect against 2019-nCoV, the best prevention against the virus is to avoid exposure. In addition, to help prevent the spread of this and other viruses, the CDC recommends washing your hands often using soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used when soap and water are not available.

Also, always use a tissue to cover your cough or sneeze, and immediately discard the tissue. If you are sick, stay at home until you are well. Do not touch your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with anyone else who is sick, and keep washing your hands.

While many stores are selling out of protective face masks, the CDC does not recommend them for coronavirus prevention. Instead, officials emphasize hand washing as more effective protection from this and any other virus.

5. The source of 2019 novel coronavirus is linked to animals, but not confirmed as the cause. Because many patients in the Wuhan, China, outbreak were linked to a large seafood and animal market, it’s possible the virus originated in an animal source. However, that cannot be confirmed until the results of analysis of the virus’ genetic tree become available. Other coronavirus that originated from animals include SARS (civet cats) and MERS (camels).

6. Speak to your doctor if you recently traveled to Wuhan, China, or other affected areas. If you returned from Wuhan, China, or other affected areas, or you think you came in contact with someone who could be infected, do not wait for symptoms to appear. Call your healthcare provider right away, and he or she will coordinate with your local public health department and the CDC to see if you should be tested.

For the most recent information about 2019 novel coronavirus, check the CDC website for updates, including the number of confirmed cases and advice for travelers.

What Will the Opioid Crisis Look Like in Five Years?

Posted on: November 20th, 2019 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

As an Infectious Disease physician, Dr. Bruce E. Ruben is always learning more about how current issues affect his patients’ healthcare. This article by Jirka Taylor and Peter Reuter originally appeared in the Concord Monitor in New Hampshire last week. Dr. Ruben found this commentary on what the opioid crisis will look like in five years to be a fascinating look at this world-wide problem and thinks his patients should read it too.

Few people had ever heard of fentanyl five years ago. By 2018 this synthetic opioid was implicated in more than 30,000 fatal overdoses in the United States. The next stage of the fast-changing opioid crisis may well depend on how the illegal drug markets morph in the years to come.

In the corners of Europe that have been dealing with fentanyl as long or longer than the United States, each illegal market for opioids took distinct turns. In some, heroin disappeared. In others, opioid nasal sprays arrived. Online sales became the norm. Any of these things could happen here.

What Will the Opioid Crisis Look Like in Five Years?

It’s Estonia where heroin practically disappeared. In the early 2000s, the Taliban’s prohibition on growing poppies in Afghanistan had a ripple effect in Europe constricting the heroin supply. Fentanyl smuggled from or through Russia took its place. Today, tiny Estonia (population about 1.3 million) has the only “mature” fentanyl market in the world.

The replacement of heroin with fentanyl in its drug market was devastating: By 2012, Estonia had one of the highest per capita rates of fatal overdoses in the world. Two other observations, however, offer a bit more reassurance. First, fentanyl does not seem to attract new users: The number of opioid users in Estonia began declining in the 1990s and has continued on that trend. Second, although fentanyl is much cheaper than heroin to produce and ship, drug traffickers do not appear to have lowered street prices, also limiting its spread.

Nearby Latvia underwent a different shift, essentially skipping the fentanyl stage. Stronger variations of the fentanyl molecule, called analogs, started appearing in large quantities around 2014. Until very recently, the most common was carfentanil. One gram of pure carfentanil represents thousands of lethal doses for those without opioid tolerance.

Despite this dangerous potency, Latvian health statistics don’t show a substantial increase in overdose deaths. This suggests that Latvian users and dealers have found comparatively safer ways of consuming synthetic opioids and that overdose death levels don’t inevitably have to skyrocket like they did in Estonia. (Some certainly go unrecorded, but the undercount would have to be enormous for Latvia’s fatal overdose rate to approach Estonia’s.)

Sweden, unlike every other country, developed parallel opioid markets: one for heroin and another for fentanyl analogs. Around 2014, dealers started selling fentanyl analogs online, offering direct-mail delivery. After a period of experimentation, these online dealers settled on an analog nasal spray—a popular alternative for people who preferred not to inject drugs.

Some, though not all, of these facets—the disappearance of heroin, direct online sales, nasal sprays, potent analogs—have begun to pop up in distinct pockets of the United States. None have become widespread in North America yet—but there is no reason why they couldn’t.

Sweden, Latvia and Estonia are, to be sure, much smaller than the United States. But it is useful to think of them as equivalent to a city or small state with a comparatively concentrated supply chain. That also shows us regions just a few hundred miles apart might be affected by fentanyl in completely different ways. The areas of North America that have suffered the most in the opioid crisis—New England, the Midwest, Appalachia, British Columbia—are likely to confront fentanyl in localized ways as well. That will have ramifications for prevention, provision of treatment and other services, and law enforcement efforts.

Despite the variations, there is an overarching commonality to the European cases, too: Once a synthetic opioid like fentanyl becomes dominant, it stays that way. The United States should prepare for fentanyl and other synthetic opioids as a lasting phenomenon, and learning from other countries’ experiences is an important part of that effort.

Jirka Taylor is a policy analyst at the nonpartisan, nonprofit RAND Corporation. Peter Reuter is a professor in the School of Public Policy and Department of Criminology at the University of Maryland. Both are authors of “The Future of Fentanyl and Other Synthetic Opioids.”

 

The Mayo Clinic on the Effects of Hyperbaric Oxygen Treatment

Posted on: November 6th, 2019 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

Overview

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves breathing pure oxygen in a pressurized room or tube. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a well-established treatment for decompression sickness, a hazard of scuba diving. Other conditions treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy include serious infections, bubbles of air in your blood vessels, and wounds that won’t heal as a result of diabetes or radiation injury.

hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-chamber-west bloomfield-michigan

In a hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber, the air pressure is increased to three times higher than normal air pressure. Under these conditions, your lungs can gather more oxygen than would be possible breathing pure oxygen at normal air pressure.

Your blood carries this oxygen throughout your body. This helps fight bacteria and stimulate the release of substances called growth factors and stem cells, which promote healing.

Why it’s done

Your body’s tissues need an adequate supply of oxygen to function. When tissue is injured, it requires even more oxygen to survive. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy increases the amount of oxygen your blood can carry. An increase in blood oxygen temporarily restores normal levels of blood gases and tissue function to promote healing and fight infection.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used to treat several medical conditions. And medical institutions use it in different ways. Your doctor may suggest hyperbaric oxygen therapy if you have one of the following conditions:

  • Anemia, severe
  • Brain abscess
  • Bubbles of air in your blood vessels (arterial gas embolism)
  • Burn
  • Decompression sickness
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning
  • Crushing injury
  • Deafness, sudden
  • Gangrene
  • Infection of skin or bone that causes tissue death
  • Nonhealing wounds, such as a diabetic foot ulcer
  • Radiation injury
  • Skin graft or skin flap at risk of tissue death
  • Vision loss, sudden and painless

The evidence is insufficient to support claims that hyperbaric oxygen therapy can effectively treat the following conditions:

  • AIDS/HIV
  • Allergies
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Arthritis
  • Asthma
  • Autism
  • Bell’s palsy
  • Brain injury
  • Cancer
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome
  • Cirrhosis
  • Depression
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Gastrointestinal ulcers
  • Heart disease
  • Heatstroke
  • Hepatitis
  • Migraine
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Sports injury
  • Stroke

Risks

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is generally a safe procedure. Complications are rare. But this treatment does carry some risk.

Potential risks include:

  • Temporary nearsightedness (myopia) caused by temporary eye lens changes
  • Middle ear injuries, including leaking fluid and eardrum rupture, due to increased air pressure
  • Lung collapse caused by air pressure changes (barotrauma)
  • Seizures as a result of too much oxygen (oxygen toxicity) in your central nervous system
  • In certain circumstances, fire — due to the oxygen-rich environment of the treatment chamber

How you prepare

Pure oxygen can cause fire if a spark or flame ignites a source of fuel. Because of this, you can’t take items such as lighters or battery-powered devices into the hyperbaric oxygen therapy chamber. In addition, to limit sources of excess fuel, you may need to remove hair and skincare products that are petroleum-based and potentially a fire hazard. Ask a member of your health care team for specific instructions before your first hyperbaric oxygen therapy session.

What you can expect

During hyperbaric oxygen therapy

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy typically is performed as an outpatient procedure and doesn’t require hospitalization. If you’re already hospitalized and require hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll remain in the hospital for therapy. Or you’ll be transported to a hyperbaric oxygen facility that’s separate from the hospital.

Depending on the type of medical institution you go to and the reason for treatment, you may receive hyperbaric oxygen therapy in one of two settings:

  • A unit designed for 1 person. In an individual (monoplace) unit, you lie down on a table that slides into a clear plastic tube.
  • A room designed to accommodate several people. In a multiperson hyperbaric oxygen room — which usually looks like a large hospital room — you may sit or lie down. You may receive oxygen through a mask over your face or a lightweight, clear hood placed over your head.

During hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the air pressure in the room is about two to three times normal air pressure. The increased air pressure will create a temporary feeling of fullness in your ears — similar to what you might feel in an airplane or at a high elevation. You can relieve that feeling by yawning or swallowing.

For most conditions, therapy lasts approximately two hours. Members of your health care team will monitor you and the therapy unit throughout your treatment.

After hyperbaric oxygen therapy

You may feel somewhat tired or hungry following your treatment. This doesn’t limit normal activities.

Results

To benefit from hyperbaric oxygen therapy, you’ll likely need more than one session. The number of sessions depends on your medical condition. Some conditions, such as carbon monoxide poisoning, might be treated in three visits. Others, such as nonhealing wounds, may require 20 to 40 treatments.

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy alone can often effectively treat decompression sickness, arterial gas embolism and severe carbon monoxide poisoning.

To effectively treat other conditions, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is used as part of a comprehensive treatment plan and administered with other therapies and drugs that fit your individual needs.

 

Contact Encompass Healthcare today to schedule a consultation with Dr. Bruce Ruben

Why We’re the Alternative to Hospitals

Posted on: September 26th, 2019 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

Hospitals have been in the news a lot lately. The University of Michigan is set to build a nearly billion-dollar new hospital on the University’s Ann Arbor campus. Beaumont Hospital is growing its health system. Other hospitals are merging with each other and raising millions of dollars to start new facilities and departments. All of this sounds like it should be good news, but the truth is that hospitals are not the only option to treat health issues and illness. Hospitals also have many faults, chief of which is their inability to offer personalized, holistic medicine.

Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine, founded and led by Dr. Bruce Ruben, prides itself on being a non-hospital option. Hospitals claim they practice “patient-centered care,” but it’s quite obvious they cannot do this because they are simply too massive in size. Hospitals treat too many patients and have thousands of providers who are overworked and underpaid. Encompass likes to focus on you — our patient.

 

Dr Bruce Ruben Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine

 

At Encompass HealthCare, we provide medical care that is respectful of individual patient preferences, needs, and values. While hospitals are impressive in size with massive campuses and annual revenues that could buy and sell small nations, they present many problems for health treatment, wound care, infectious disease and caregiving. They are busy at all times of the day and extremely noisy for people trying to get some relief and relaxation.

Encompass puts the patient first. We offer a small, intimate location that is quiet and calming. We focus on you and your needs. Now you understand why we are the alternative to hospitals. And we like it that way.

What’s Sleep Got To Do With Healing?

Posted on: January 29th, 2019 by Mindy Ruben No Comments

What does sleep have to do with infection healing and wound healing?

A lot!

In fact, according to a recent article, when you sleep, your brain can attend to other issues within your body. When there are areas that need healing, the brain triggers the release of hormones that encourage tissue growth to repair blood vessels. This helps wounds to heal faster AND also restores sore or damaged muscles. While you sleep, your body can make more white blood cells that can attack viruses and bacteria that may interfere with the healing process. So if you are being treated for an infectious disease or a serious infection, getting enough sleep will be a critical part of your healing plan!

In fact, when you don’t get enough sleep, your immune system is not able to properly protect the body from infection. So getting an infection in the first place becomes a greater risk. According to expert Infectious Disease and Wound Healing doctor Bruce E. Ruben, M.D. of West Bloomfield, Michigan, this is true for viral, bacterial, and fungal infections. Dr. Bruce Ruben treats patients from all over Oakland County, Michigan.

It is true that many of us struggle with the ability to get more sleep. We all have so much to do, we live busy lives and somehow sleep gets the short end of the stick. Afterall, that’s what coffee is for, right?! Well, putting all kidding aside, it’s important to consider sleep in infection healing and in wound healing.

So now you know that good, restful sleep is one way that your body recovers from damage and protects itself against illness. If getting those zzzz’s seems like an arduous task, think of it as a “prescription”–one that comes from your own body’s desire to get better, heal, and to remain healthy.

What’s sleep got to do with infection & wound healing?

Encompass Healthcare is Grateful For Our Patients and Caregivers

Posted on: December 12th, 2018 by Encompass Healthcare No Comments

It’s hard to believe that the year 2018 is almost over. It’s been a wonderful year for us at Encompass HealthCare and Wound Medicine and a time for reflection. While we have been helping men and women in pain for many years, we still think of our medical practice as a new endeavor — and as an alternative to big-business hospitals. Dr. Bruce Ruben and his health care team are constantly working to use innovative medicine for our patients. We see it as our mission to keep ourselves several steps ahead of the pace in the medical field.

 

 

Our treatments for pain care and wound management are constantly evolving to meet the needs of our patients. The recent Thanksgiving holiday gave us an opportunity to count our blessings. We are so very grateful for our many patients and caregivers, who put their trust in our medical team of professionals. We see ourselves as teammates and partners with you.

At Encompass, we take your health very seriously and take great pride in keeping apprised of the many recent changes in how to treat ailments such as diabetic neuropathy, skin infections, bone infections, wounds and different forms of infectious diseases. The gratitude we receive when a patient or caregiver is satisfied with the level of service, the quality of care and the hospitality at Encompass reminds us that what we do really makes a difference. It gives our patients and their caregivers peace of mind.

During the winter holiday season, we gave thanks for all the good that we have in our lives. All of us at Encompass are grateful for you — our partners. We wish you a joyous and blessed holiday season and a successful ending to 2018. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions regarding your health or the health of someone you love.

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